JULY WRAP – One team rakes at a .323 pace, another puts up a 2.60 ERA.

It’s August 1, which means it’s time for Baseball Roundtable’s look back at July – the stats, the stories and the highlights. We could call July Dodger Month, Beltre Month, Altuve Month,  Paxton Month or maybe even Devers Month.  Here are a few notable highlights:

  • Adrian Beltre had a milestone month – picking up his 3,000th base hit (July 30); 5,000th total base (July 7); and 1,600th RBI (July 14). Better start clearing a sport on the wall at Cooperstown.
  • The Dodgers went a sparkling 20-3 for the month, expanding their NL West Division lead to 14 games over the Diamondbacks.
  • The Astros’ Jose Altuve’s month of July included a 19-game hitting streak, during which he hit .524.
  • James Paxton was the only pitcher to win six games – going 6-0, with a 1.37 ERA for the Mariners – who went only 8-12 in the games Paxon didn’t start.
  • Boston Red Sox’ rookie Rafael Devers was a .296 hitter over four minor league seasons, but he appears to like major league pitching even better. The 20-year-old made his major league debut on July 25 (becoming MLB’s youngest active player) and, in six July games, hit .417 (10-for-24) with two home runs, four RBI and four runs scored.
  • The Astros hit a remarkable .323 at a team for July (the only team above .300), while the Dodgers put up a stingy 2.60 ERA for the montk (the only team below 3.00).

Still, the best moniker for July might be trade deadline month – as lots of players were moved as we approached the July 31 trade deadline.   We’ll take a look at all this and the month’s highlight and statistical leaders coming up.  But first the standings and Baseball Roundtable’s Players and Pitchers of the Month.

COMING SOON:  Baseball Roundtable’s look at July trades.

THE STANDINGS

The Dodgers went 20-3 for the month (an .870 winning percentagte) and are now 74-31 on the season – the only team playing .700 ball. Pitching led the way for the boys from LA, as their 2.60 earned run average was far and away the lowest in MLB for the month. While the Dodgers 107 runs scored in July ranked 22nd among MLB teams, they still managed to outscore the opposiution by 38 runs.  Leading the way for the Dodgers in July was the now DL-ed Clayton Kershaw (3-0, 0.72 ERA); the surpising Rich Hill (4-0, 1.45); and, of course, Kenley Jansen with nine saves in ten opportunities.

If you are looking for offense, the Astros rode a month in which they led the majors in runs scored (174); batting average (a resounding .323); and home runs (44) to a 15-9 July record – depite MLB’s ninth worst ERA for the month (5.08).  Leading the way for the Astros were Jose Altuve (.485 for the month); George Springer (.403); Alex Bregman (.329); and Evan Gattis (.322).

Other squads putting up solid July results (at least 15 wins) wer the Cubs and Nationals (16-8), Royals (16-10) and Indians  (15-11).

The worst July record belonged to the White Sox (6-19) in the AL and the Reds (8-18) in the NL.

If the season ended July 31, your playoff teams would be.

AL:  Division Leaders – Yankees, Indians, Astros. Wild Cards: Red Sox and Royals.

NL: Division Leaders: Nationals, Cubs and Dodgers; Wild Cards: Diamondbacks anad Rockies/

Notably, there are three competitive division races: In the NL Central, the Cubs lead the Brewers by 2 ½ games; in the AL Central the Royals are two games back of the Indians; and in the AL East, the Yankees jhold just a ½-game dge on the Red Sox.

A full chart of July 31 standings and month of July won-lost records appears at the end of this  post. 

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BASEBALL ROUNDTABLE PLAYERS AND PITCHERS OF THE MONTH

NL Player of the Montrh – Nolan Arenado, 3B, Rockies

I love those players who give you plenty of offense AND defense and no one does it better than four-time (in four seasons) Gold Glover at third base Nolan Arenado. He’s also a two-time NL RBI leader (and current 2017 leader) and two-time league home run champ. So, what did he do to earn Player of the Month for July? He hit .389, with eight home runs, 18 runs scored and an MLB-leading 30 RBI (in just 22 games played). Also under consideration were Rockies’ CF Charlie Blackmon, who hit .370, with seven home runs, 13 RBI and an MLB-leading 29 July runs scored. Blackmon also had three triples in July, adding to his season total of 13 three-baggers – six more than the next-best total.  I also took a look at the Marlins’  RF Giancalo Stanton. who led MLB with 12 July home runs – to go with a .289 average and 23 RBI. 

NL Pitcher of the Month – Rich Hill, LHP, Dodgers

This was a tough choice, but I went with Dodgers’ veteran Rich Hill. He went 4-0 in five starts (no NL pitcher won more than four games in July), with a nifty 1.45 ERA (behind only fellow Dodger Clayton Kershaw and the Phillies’ Aaron Nola among National Leaguers with at least 25 innings pitched in July).  The 37-year-old southpaw also walked just five batters, while fanning 40, in 31 innings. Also in the running were Kershaw (3-0, 0.72 in four starts); Nola (3-1, 1.32 with 43 strikeouts in 34 innings); and Max Scherzer (3-0, 2.84 with a league-topping 50 strikeouts in 31 2/3 innings.)

AL Player of the Month – Jose Altuve, 2B, Astros

What can you say about a guy who hits an MLB-leading .485 for the month, raps out an MLB-tops 48 hits, gives you a little power (four home runs) and speed (eight stolen bases), while also scoring 22 times and driving  in 21? Jose  Altuve’s July totals incuded a 19-game hitting streak, during which he hit .524, with ten doubles, one triple, four home runs, 21 runs scored and 19 RBI. Clearly, Altuve does it all – and is a deserving Player of the Month.  Also considered were Rangers’ 3B Adrian Beltre who – as noted earlier –  achieved several milestone including his 3,000th MLB hit.  At age 38, Beltre went .341-4-14 for the month.  Clearly, twenty years into an MLB career and Beltre can still rake.   Orioles’ 2B Jonathan Schoop was also on the radar for this recogition after a .343-9-28 month of July. 

AL Pitcher of the Month – James Paxton, LHP, Mariners

James Paxton photo

Photo by hj_west

Mariners’ southpaw James Paxton put up stellar numbers in July – going 6-0, with a 1.37 ERA in six starts.  (Numbers which look even better given Seattle’s 14-12 record for the month.) Paxton also fanned 46 batters, while walking just six, in 39 1/3 Innings. The 28-year-old Paxton is now 11-3 on the season, with a 2.68 ERA.  So, how does it add up?  For July, Paxton was in the AL’s top five  in starts, wins, inning pitched, strikeouts and ERA. Coming into 2017, Paxton was 18-15, 3.43 in fifty MLB starts over four seasons.  Also in the running was Red Sox’ ace Chris Sale (3-1, 1.04 with a league-leading 56 strikeouts in 34 2/3 innings.)  

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NOW FOR SOME JULY HIGHLIGHTS

WHAT GOES AROUND, COME AROUND

On July 15,  Cody Bellinger become the first Dodgers’  rookie to hit for the cycle – going four-for-five  – with the requisite single, double, triple and home run – notching three RBI and two runs scored in a 7-1 Dodgers’ win over the Marlins. It was the first four-hit game of the 22-year-old rookie’s career – and his 26th home run of the season. For a look at all the MLB rookies who have hit for the cycle, click here.

IT’S NOT ALL ABOUT THE HOME RUN – HOW ABOUT A WALK-OFF WALK

Dodgers’ rookie Cody Bellinger added four home runs to his rookie-season total in July – and ended the month at 28.  However, it wasn’t all about the long ball. On July 8, Bellinger propelled the Dodgers to their 60th win of the season (the first team to reach 60 wins in 2017) by waiting out a bases-loaded walk in the bottom of the tenth inning – giving  the Dodgers a 5-4 win over Rays in LA.  Of course, as it seems is always the case this year, the long ball did play a part. Bellinger had tied the game with a home run in the bottom of the eighth. Keep an eye of this rookie.  After nine home runs in May and 13 in June, he slippeed to four in July.  Time for some adjustment?

LOOK OUT JOE! HERE COMES THE JUDGE!

Aaron Judge YANKEES photo

Photo by apardavila

On July 7, Yankees’ rookie phenom Aaron Judge hit his 30th home run of the season – eclipsing Joe DiMaggio’s Yankee rookie record of 29 home runs – with plenty of season left. Judege ended July with a stat line of .303-34-75 – leading MLB in home runs and slugging percentage and topping the AL in runs scored and walks. Oh yeah, and he won the All Star Game Home Run Derby.

 

 

CRUZIN’ TO NUMBER 300

On July 7, Seattle DH Nelson Cruz hit his 300th roundtripper as the Mariners bested the Oakland A’s 7-2 to snap an eight-game losing streak – it was his 16th home run of the season and his second in July.  He finished the month with seven July homers, 21 on the season and 305 career blasts.

WOMEN BELONG IN BASEBALL

On July 15, Stacy Piagno made her first start on the mound for the  Sonoma Stompers of the  (independent) Pacific Association of Professional Baseball Clubs – as they took on the Pittsburg Diamonds. Piagno pitched seven innings, giving up just one run on four hits and notching four strikeouts as Sanoma prevailed 16-1.  With that outing, Piagno became the third women to notch a professional baseball victory since the 1950s – following Ila Borders and Eri Yoshida to victories from the hil.

HOW ABOUT SHOWING A LITTLE RESPECT

Max Scherzer - ambushed by the Diamondbacks. Photo by Keith Allison

Max Scherzer –
ambushed by the Diamondbacks.
Photo by Keith Allison

Two-time Cy Young Award winner Max Scherzer came into his July 21 start against the Diamondacks with an  11-5, record and a sparkling 2.01 ERA.  The Diamondbacks showed the Nationals’ ace very little respect, however.  After three batters and just ten pitches, the Diamondbacks had three homne runs and a 3-0 lead.  Leadoff hitter/RF  David Peralta homered to deep  right, followed by CF  A.J. Pollock’s blast down the left field line and 3B Jake Lamb’s RF home run. The three round trippers tied the MLB record for consecutive home runs to start a game.

How unexpected was the three-homer barrage? Scherzer had allowed just one home run over 34 2/3 innings in his past five starts. Scherzer did settle down and lasted five innings (eight hits, two walks, five runs and nine strikeouts – no decision) as the Nationals fell to the D-backs 6-5.

PARITY?

The MLB All Star competition is as even as can be: 43 AL wins, 43 NL wins, two ties – AND both teams have scored exactly 361 runs ovr the 88 games.

ONE FOR THE RECORD BOOKS

On July 23, The Orioles’ Zach Britton set a new AL record by converting his 55th straight save opportunity – pitching a scoreless ninth in a 9-7 win over the Astros.   Britton extended his record with saves (versus the Rangers) on July 29 and July 30.  He’s still a long way form the MLB record, however.  That belongs to  the Dodgers’ Eric Gagne, with 84 straight  conversions from August 28, 2002 to July 3, 2004.

A BALANCED ATTACK

Carlos Santana Indians photo

Photo by Keith Allison

On July 24, 1B Carlos Santana provide some well-blanced offense for the Indians.  The switch hitter homered both left-handed and right-handed, as the Indians stopped the Reds 6-2. It was the fourth time in his career that Santana had homered from both sides of the plate in the same game. For those interested – through June of this year, the feat had been accompliehdd 312 times at the major league level.  In 2017 alone, the Indians have accomplished it four times (Jose Ramirez twice, Francisco Lindor and Santana). Others to go yard from both sides in a game this season include the Yankees’ Aaron Hicks, Astros’ Marwin Gonzalez, Blue Jays’ Kendrys Morales, Dodgers’ Yasmani Grandal and Phillies’ Freddie Galvis. Nick Swisher and Mark Tiexiera share the MLB record for career games with home runs both left- and right-handed at 13.

 

MINOR LEAGUE NO-O-OTE

On Sunday, July 23, the Rookie Level Gulf Cost League (GCL) Nationals used four pitchers to throw a pair of seven-inning no-hitters. In Game One of a doubleheader (a 4-0 Nationals’ win over the Marlins), Joan Baez went six innings (no hits, one walk, seven strikeouts), with Jose Jimenez throwing the final frame. Game Two (Nationals 1 – Marlins 0) saw Jared Johnson go four no-hit innings (one walk, two strikeouts), with Gilberto Chu tossing the final three (no walks, four whiffs.)

A TRIPLE PLAY PRODUCES A RUN – A FIRST FOR FRAZIER

On July 25, in his first at bat at Yankee Stadium, Todd Frazier came to the plate in the bottom of the second inning, with the sacks full and no one out. Matt Holliday was on third, Didi Gregorious on second and Chase Headly on first.  All had reached via singles. Frazier, facing rookie starter Luis Castillo, hit a one-hopper to Reds’ SS Jose Peraza. Peraza tagged second for out number one, then threw to 1B Joey Votto for the second out.  As this traditonal double play was completed, Holliday scored from third. Things then got interesting. Gregorious, who had been on second, stopped between second and third and basically found himself in the proverbial “pickle” between Reds’ 3B Eugenio Suarez and Peraza.   In the end, the Reds recorded a 6-6-3-3-5-6 triple play and the Yankees recorded a run.  Ultimately, the Bronx Bombers prevailed 4-2 – but it was a pretty memorable first Yankee Stadium at bat for Frazieer.  It also was just the tenth time (in 712 triple plays) that a run has scored on an MLB triple killing.

BACK – TO BACK-TO BACK-TO BACK  … AND THEN SOME

On July 27, the Washington Nationals put an exclamaiton point on what some are calling “The Year of the Home Run” by tying a pair of MLB long-ball records – powering an MLB-record-tying four consecutive home runs and a record-tying five home runs  in an inning. The third-inning outburst led to seven runs as Washington topped the Brewers 15-2 in D.C.  It was the only the sixth time an MLB team has notched a five-dinger inning (and the eighth time a team had rappeed four consecutive home runs) and featured long balls by CF Brian Goodwin (his tenth of the season); SS Wilmer Difo (third of the season); RF Bryce Harper (27th); 1B Ryan Zimmerman (21st); and 3B Anthony Rendon (21st).  For full details on the other record holders, click  here.

WORKING ON THE SOUTH 40

No player has ever hit 40 home runs in a Royals’ uniform (they are the only team without a 40-HR player in their history), but Mike Moustakas seems to be on his way. On July 28, Moustakas ripped his 30th home run of the 2017 season – a three-run shot as the Royals topped the Red Sox 4-2 in Boston.  (It was the streaking Royals ninth straight win.)  The home run made “Moose” the fastest Royal to reach thirty long balls – coming in his 364th at bat of the season. Previously, another third sacker – Gary Gaetti – was the quickest Royal to thirty dingers in a campaign at 410 ats bats (in 1995).  Gaetti hit 35 that season, one short of Steve Balboni’s Royals’ record.  Nicknames seem to be all the rage for Royals’ home run hitters – Moustakas is known as “Moose,” Gaetti as “G-Man” or “Rat” and Balboni as “Bye Bye.”

 

——STAT TIME … FOR THE MONT OF JULY AND YEAR-TO-DATE (throogh July 31)—-

—–TEAM BATTING LEADERS … MONTH OF JULY—–

Average (MLB Average – .257)

NL:  Rockies- .297;  Marlins – .279; Dodgers – .275; Nationals – .275

AL: Astros – .323; Tigers – .280; Royals – 279

Runs Scored (MLB Average – 117)

NL: Rockies – 148; Marlins – 139; Nationals – 128

AL: Astros  – 174; Royals – 141; Indians – 135; Tigers – 135

WE’LL TAKE THE LOW ROAD

The White Sox and Angels plated the fewest runs in MLB in July – with only 88 runners  crossing the plate for each squad.  (The Reds were the lowest in the NL with 93 tallies.) The White Sox also had the lowest batting average for the month at .229; while the Giants showed the least power with an MLB-low 14 round trippers during the month. The Astros hit more than 100-points higher than the White Sox and bashed more than three times as many home runs as the Giants. 

Home Runs (MLB Average – 31)

NL: Cubs  – 40; Nationals – 37; Marlins – 35; Dodgers – 35

AL:  Astros – 44; Rangers – 41; Royals – 38

Stolen Bases (MLB Average – 12)

NL: Brewers – 20; Reds – 15; Braves – 15

AL: Astros – 23; Royals – 22; Indians – 20

I THINK I’LL JUST WAIT HERE

The Mets attempted (and achieved) MLB’s fewest stolen bases in July – going three-for-five in steals. The Blue Jays had the worst rate of success – swiping four bags in eight tries.

Walks (MLB Average – 82)

NL: D-backs – 101; Reds – 96; Marlins – 91

AL: A’s – 112; Indians – 106;  Blue Jays – 105

GRABBING A LITTLE AIR

The Brewers led all of MLB in strikeouts in July with 254 whiffs – which equatea to just over ten per game. 

—–TEAM PITCHING LEADERS … MONTH OF JULY—–

Earned Run Average (MLB Average – 4.37)

NL: Dodgers – 2.60; Cardinals – 3.06; D-backs – 3.48

AL:  Red Sox – 3.24; Indians – 3.36; Mariners – 3.68

PUTTING UP SOME CROOKED NUMBERS

Eleven teams had ERA’s over 5.00 for July. The White Sox led (trailed?) all of MLB at 5.68, while the Rockies gave up an NL-leading 5.38 earned runs per nine innings.

Fewest Runs Allowed (MLB Average – 117)

NL: Dodgers – 69; D-backs – 87; Cardinals -94; Pirates – 94.

AL: Indians – 94; Red Sox – 101;  Angels – 102

IT’S OUTTA HERE

Your team leader in home runs allowed in July was the White Sox – the ChiSox staff gave up 47 long balls; while the Reds topped the NL with 44. On the other side of the coin, the Dodgers gave up an MLB-low 17 July dingers.

Strikeouts (MLB Average – 209)

NL: Nationals – 229; Reds – 227; Brewers – 220

AL: Red Sox – 265; Yankees – 264; Indians – 251

Fewest Walks Allowed (MLB Average – 82)

NL: Dodgers – 49; D-backs – 62; Cardinals – 64

AL: Twins – 65; Indians – 68;  Orioles – 72

LET ME TAKE YOU ON A FREE RIDE

The Blue Jays gave up an MLB-high 118 walks in July; while the Braves provided an NL-leading 108 free passes.  The only other teams to exceed 100 walks allowed were the White Sox and Marlins (106 each).    

Saves (MLB average – 6)

NL: Dodgers – 10; Padres – 10; five with seven

AL: Rays – 9; Mariners – 8; two with seven

OUCH!

The Diamonbacks had the worst save/opportunity percentage in July – blowing five of seven save opportunities – for a 28.6 percent success rate.  The MLB average for the month was 66.0 percent. 

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—–INDIVIDUAL BATTING LEADERS FOR THE MONTH OF JUlY—–

Average (minimum 50 at bats)

NL:  Gerardo Parra, Rockies .443; Chris Taylor, Dodgers  – .394; Anthony Rendon, Nationals – .392

AL: Jose Altuve, Astros – .485;  George Springer, Astros – .403; Alex Pressley, Tigers – .380

Home Runs

NL: Giancarlo Stanton, Marlins – 12; Bryce Harper, Nationals – 9; three with eight

AL: Rougned Odor, Rangers – 10; Mike Moustakas, Royals – 9; Jonathan Schoop, Orioles – 9

IT SEEMS LIKE HE’S ALWAYS ON BASE

Among players with at least 50 July at bats, only two got on base at least half the time.  Your on-base-percentage leaders were: Jose Altuve, Astros – .523; Anthony Rendon, Nationals – .500.

RBI

NL: Nolan Arenado, Rockies – 30;  Marcel Ozuna Marlins – 27; Giancarlo Stanton, Marlins – 23

AL: Jonatshan Schoop, Orioles – 28; Dustin Pedroia, Red Sox – 25; Mookie Betts, Red Sox – 23

Runs Scored

NL: Charlie Blackmon, Rockies – 29; Bryce Harper, Nationals – 26; Giancarlo Stanton, Marlins – 25

AL: Alex Bregman, Astros – 24; Eric Hosmer, Royals – 22; Jose Altuve – Astros -22

WAIT FOR IT. WAIT FOR IT.

The Blue Jays’ Josh Donaldson was MLB’s most patient hitter in July – averaging 4.83 pitched per plate appearance – edging the Twins’ Joe Mauer at 4.82. 

Stolen Bases

NL:  Billy Hamilotn, Reds – 11; Dee Gordon, Marlins – 9; four with five

AL: Rajai Davis, A’s – 9; Whit Merrifield, Royals – 9; Jose Altuve, Astros – 8

Walks

NL:  Joey Votto, Reds – 23; Paul Goldschjmidt, D-backs – 22; two with 19

AL: Edwin Encarnacion, Indians – 20; Brett Gardner , Yankees – 20; Josh Donaldson, Blue Jays – 19

WAY BELOW THE M-LINE

The lowest average (minimum 50 June at bats) for the month went to the Twins’  Jorge Polanco at .078 (four-for-51).  

—–INDIVIDUAL PITCHING LEADERS … THE MONTH OF JULY—–

Wins

NL:  Seven pitchers with four

AL:  James Paxton, Mariners – 6-0, 1.37;  three with four

ERA (Minimum 25 July innings)

NL:  Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers  – 0.72;  Aaron Nola, Phillies – 1.32; Rich Hill, Dodgers – 1.45

AL:  Chris Sale, Red Sox – 1.04; James Paxton, Mariners – 1.37; Sonny Gray, A’s – 1.48

GETTING UP THERE A BIT

The worst ERA among pitchers with at least four starts or 15 innings pitched in July went to the Marlins’ Tom Koehler, who had four July starts and put up a 9.87 ERA in 17 1/3 innings. Using those same parameters in the AL,we find the  Astros’ Lance McCullers Jr., with an ERA of   9.64 in four June starts (18 2/3 innings). 

Strikeouts

NL: Max Scherzer – 50 (31 2/3 IP); Aaron Nola, Phillies 43 (34 IP); Rich Hill, Dodgers – 40 (31 IP)

AL: Corey Kluber, Indians – 56 (34 1/3 IP); Chris Sale, Red Sox – 56 (34 2/3 IP); three with 46

Saves

NL:  Kenley Jansen, Dodgers – 9; Greg Holland, Rockies – 7; A.J. Ramos, Mets/Marlins – 7

AL: Alex Colome, Rays – 9; Edwin Diaz, Mariners – 8; two with seven

TOUGHEST OUTING OF THE MONTH

The Blue Jays’ Glenn Sparkman may have had the toughest outing of the month.  The rookie righty was brought into a July 2 game against the Red Sox in the top of the seventh and the Blue Jays already down 7-1.  Sparkman’s appearance went: single; single; single; strikeout; double; single; double; double. Ultimately, he gave up seven earned runs  in 1/3 of an inning – for a July ERA of 189.00.  In his only previous MLB apperance (June 30), also against the Red Sox, he went 2/3 of an inning, giving up no earned runs, despite allowing two hits and a walk.  There is clearly a potential for better things to come – Sparkman has a 2.65 ERA in five minor league seasons, with 267 strikeouts in 268 1/3 innings. 

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NOW THE YEAR-TO-DATE STATS (Still with me?)

—–TEAM BATTING … YEAR-TO-DATE LEADERS—–

Average  (MLB Average – .255)

NL:  Nationals – .275; Rockies – .274; Marlins – .266

AL: Astros – .292; Indians – .264; Yankees – .262

THAT’LL DO IN A PINCH

No  team pinch hits more successfully than the St. Louis Cardinals – whose batters have gone 45-for-141 in pinch-hitting appearances this season, leading MLB in pinch hits and PH batting average (.319).  Just down I-70, you’ll find the Royals, with the fewest pinch hits (two) and the lowest pinch-hitting average through July (.105). 

Runs Scored (MLB average – 490)

NL: Nationals – 575; Rockies – 564; Dodgers – 535

AL: Astros – 623; Yankees – 557; Rangers – 516

THE LONG AND THE SHORT OF IT

Only the Astros topped 600 runs (through July) at 623.  The Padres, on the other hand, have scored more than 200 times fewer than Houston, with San Diego notching just 400 runs. The Astros also lead the majors with 172 home runs, with the Giants the only team under 100 round trippers (82).

Home Runs (MLB Average – 132)

NL: Nationals – 158; Brewers – 156; Mets – 152

AL:  Astros – 172; Rangers – 160;  Rays – 154

A SWING AND A MISS

Only two teams had more than 1,000 batters’ whiffs through July: the Brewers (1,040) and Rays (1,037).  Looks like a tight race for the most free-swinging squad. 

Stolen Bases (MLB Average – 55)

NL: Brewers – 89; Reds – 83; D-backs – 72

AL: Angels- 88; Rangers – 81; Red Sox – 65

—–TEAM PITCHING LEADERS … YEAR-TO-DATE (July 31)—–

Earned Run Average (MLB average – 4.35)

NL: Dodgers – 3.09; D-backs – 3.43; Cardinals – 3.82

AL: Red Sox 3.70; Indians –  3.71;  Yankees – 3.83

I’D GIVE IT A FIVE

Only two teams had ERA’s over five through July – The Reds at 5.28 and the Orioles at 5.07. 

Fewest Runs Allowed (MLB average – 490)

NL: Dodgers – 350; D-backs –  404; Cardinals – 445

AL: Indians – 409; Boston – 435; Yankees – 438

DODGERS’ STAFF AT THE TOP8888

The Dodgers’ rotation had the best starters’ ERA in the MLB (through July) at 3.25; while the Astros’ starters were best in the AL at 3.96.  In the bullpen, Cleveland ruled at 2.77.  The Dodgers had the best bullpen ERA in the NL (and second-best in MLB) at 2.83.

If you’re wondering why the Nationals (despite a big lead) were active in the trade deadline market for relievers, Washington was one of only two teams with a  bullpen ERA over 5.00 through July 31 – the Tigers at 5.25 and the Nationals at 5.05.

Strikeouts (MLB average – 866)

NL: Dodgers – 991; D-backs – 971; Nationals – 949

AL: Astros – 1064; Indians – 1022; Red Sox – 1007

Fewest Walks Allowed (MLB average – 343)

NL: Dodgers – 275; Pirates  – 297; Cardinals – 314

AL:  Indians – 288; Red Sox – 293; Yankees – 318

PUTTING UP SOME GOOD RATIOS

Through July, the Dodgers lead the NL in strikeout-to-walk ratio at 3.60; while the Indians top the AL at 3.55. Other teams with a better than three-to-one ratio: Red Sox (3.44); Astros (3.16); Yankees (3.12); D-backs (3.02). Common denominator? We’ll likely see all of them in the post season.   Also, only two teams are averaging at least ten strikeouts per nine innings: Astros (10.18); Indians (10.01).  

Saves (MLB Average – 25)

NL: Rockies – 35; Dodgers – 33; Brewers – 32

AL: Rays – 35; Twins – 29; Blue Jays – 29

LETS CONVERT 

The major-league team average for save conversions through July was 64 percent.  No team was under 50 percent, but Texas (17-for-34) was right at the low-water mark.  

—–INDIVIDUAL BATTING LEADERS YEAR TO DATE—-

Average (qualifying)

NL:  Justin Turner, Dodgers – .356; Daniel Murphy, Nationals – .332; Bryce Harper, Nationals – .329

AL: Jose Altuve, Astros – .368; Eric Hosmer, Royals – .323; Jean Segura, Mariners – 322

Home Runs

NL: Giancarlo Stanton, Marlins – 33; Cody Bellinger, Dodgers – 28; four with 27

AL: Aaron Judge, Yankees – 34;  Mike Moustakas, Royals – 30; Justin Smoak, Blue Jays – 30

HE KEEPS HITTING THOSE THREES

The Rockies’ Charlie Blackmon has 13 triples through July – no other player has more than seven.

RBI

NL: Nolan Arenado, Rockies – 91; Marcell Ozuna, Marlins – 81; two at 80

AL: Nelson Cruz, Mariners – 79;  Jonathan Schoop, Orioles – 77;  Aaron Judge, Yankees – 75

Runs Scored

NL: Charlie Blackmon, Rockies – 93; Bryce Harper, Nationals – 86; Paul Goldschmidt, D-backs – 82

 AL: Aaron Judge, Yankees – 83; George Springer, Astros – 82;  Jose Altuve, Astros – 74

Stolen Bases

NL:  Billy Hamilton, Reds – 44; Dee Gordon, Marlins – 38; Trea Turner, Nationals – 35

AL: Cameron Maybin, Angels – 25; Jarrod Dyson, Mariners – 23; Jose Altuve, Astros 22

LEADERS IN A FEW OTHER CATEGORIES

Base Hits: Jose Altuve Astros (AL) – 148; Charlie Blackmon, Rockies (NL) – 141

On Base Pct: Justin Turner, Dodgers (NL) – .455; Jose Altuve, Astros  (AL) – .430

Slugging Pct: Aaron Judge, Yankees (AL) – .639; Bryce Harper, Nationals (NL) – .627

Strikeouts:  Miguel Sano, Twins (AL) – 144; Will Myers,Padres (NL) – 127

—–PITCHING LEADERS … YEAR TO DATE (July 31)—–

Wins

NL:  Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers – 15-2, 2.04; Zack Greinke, D-backs – 13-4, 2.84; four with 12

AL:  Chris Sale, Red Sox – 13-4, 2.37; Jason Vargas, Royals – 13-4, 3.00;  two with 11

ONE (or more) THAT GOT AWAY

Rick Porcello of the Red Sox leads MLB in pitcher’s losses – with 14 losses (versus just four wins) to go with a 4.55 ERA (that would indicate he deseerved better).  Over in the NL the loss leader is the Padres’ Clayton Richard (5-12, 5.40).

ERA (qualifying) 

NL:  Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers – 2.04; Max Scherzer, Natiounals – 2.23; Gio Gonzalez, Nationals – 2.66

AL:  Chris Sale, Red Sox – 2.37; James Paxton, Mariners – 2.68; Corey Kluber, Indians – 2.90

Strikeouts

NL: Max Scherzer, Nationals – 201 (145 1/3 IP); Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers – 168 (141 1/3 IP); Jacob deGrom, Mets – 162 (139 2/3 IP)

AL: Chris Sale, Red Sox – 211 (148  1/3 IP); Chris Archer, Rays – 177 (142 IP); Corey Kluber, Indians – 161 (114 2/3 IP)

LIKE THE LONG BALL?

If you like big flys, show up when the Angels’ Ricky Nolasco or the Yankees’ Masahiro Tanaka are on the mound.  They share the MLB lead in home runs allowed at 27.

Saves

NL:  Greg Holland Rockies – 33; Kenley Jansen, Dodgers – 27; three  with 22

AL: Alex Colome, Rays – 39; Brandon  Kintzler,Twins – 28; Robert Osuma, Blue Jays – 26

A PITCHER’S BEST FRIEND

No one has induced more double play grounders  this season (through July) than Marcus Stroman of the Blue Jays with 23 … to go with a 9-5, 3.08 record.

 

JulyStandings

Primay sources:  Baseball-Reference.com; MLB.com; Society for American Baseball Research.

I tweet baseball @David BBRT

 

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Member: Society for American Baseball Research (SABR); The Baseball Reliquary; The Negro Leagues Baaseball Museum; Baseball Bloggers Alliance. 

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